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Senior College - Philosophy

History of Department

Information about the department

The department of Philosophy caters to the emotional, spiritual and intellectual needs of students. It helps them to open up the horizons of the mind and to think beyond the conventional and mundane aspects of our everyday life.
No lecture is complete without thundering debates and discussions. The classroom interactions make students challenge their deepest convictions that he or she has always believed in.

The modern teaching methods adopted by the department are a balance of three styles of teaching:

  1. Transmissive Approach: Lecture Method
  2. Generative Approach: Through a process of enquiry, exploration and discovery of the subject.
  3. Transformative Approach: To extend it from the classroom to the world.

The philosophy of the department is that if you’re not living on the edge then your occupying too much space in this world and that its better to jump into the unknown and keep coming up with creative yet constructive ideas than to be always sure of yourself and live within the parameters of the known.

Activities of the Department:

  1. Visit to holistic healers.
  2. Yoga camps at the Yoga Institute, Santacruz.
  3. Talks by experts on topics like on Past Life Therapy, Colour Therapy, Importance of Proper Nutrition and Exercise, etc.
  4. Meditation Session
  5. Sessions of Aasanas, Pranayama and Yogic Meditation.
  6. Sattvic Lunches
  7. Tarot Sessions
  8. Sessions on Existential Painting with Hermeneutical Interpretation.
  9. Sessions on Food and Philosophy.
  10. Plays presented by Students on Rebirth, Buddhism, Jainism, etc.
  11. Session on Motivational Games and Exercises.
  12. Session with TYBA students on Paintings on feelings aroused by terror attacks.
  13. Going for movies related to the discipline for e.g., New York
  14. Field trip to various religious sites like Gurudwaras, Haji Ali, Temples, Churches, etc.

USP

Study of philosophy touches the heart and soul of students.

Email-id : simminbawa@gmail.com

Faculty

Faculty Dept of Philosophy Senior College

  • Ms.Simmin Bawa - Head of the Department
    B.A. (1st class), M.A. (1st class), NET
    Comparative Religion, Indian Ethics, J. Krishnamurti.

Syllabus

F.Y.B.A. Moral Philosophy

The following syllabus for FYBA titled Moral Philosophy (Semester I & II) proposed to be brought into effect from the academic year June 2014

Objectives of the Course: The course aims to:

  1.  Familiarize students with significant slices of the history of moral theory from Greek to contemporary times
  2.  Inculcate in students a sense of morality based on analytical reasoning rather than dogmatic assertion
  3.  Provide students with an ethical framework for assessing moral decisions in different areas of life.
  4.  Encourage students to appreciate the relevance of different moral cultures and outlooks in a globalized world.

Class: F.Y.B.A
Paper: Moral Philosophy
Semester: I    
Marks:  75              
Code: UAPHI 101           
No. of Lectures: 60

Unit 1:  Introduction to Moral Philosophy [ 15 lectures]
(a) Definition, nature and scope (branches) of philosophy
(b) Nature of moral philosophy (facts and values; intrinsic and extrinsic values) and areas of ethics (descriptive ethics, normative ethics, meta-ethics and applied ethics)
(c) Ethical Relativism: arguments defending this position; critical evaluation
Unit 2:  Ethics of the Gita [ 15 lectures]
(a)  Dharma (duty): Philosophy of non-attachment (nishkama karma yoga)
(b) Sthitaprajna: the moral ideal
(c) Paths to liberation: devotion (bhakti) knowledge (jnana) and action (karma)
Unit 3: The Good Life: Greek Ethics [ 15 lectures]
(a) Socratic Ethics: virtue is knowledge; can ethics be taught?
(b) The Four Virtues: Plato (in the context of Republic)
(c) Ethics of Character: Aristotle
Unit 4: Are we Free?: Freedom and Determinism [ 15 lectures]
(a) Determinism: types of determinism: scientific determinism, religious determinism (i.e. predestination) and fatalism; critical appraisal of determinism
(b) Indeterminism (i.e. libertarianism): arguments in support of free will; agency theory of freedom; critical appraisal of indeterminism
(c) Compatibilism: reconciling determinism and freedom

Internal Assessment Class Test ( 20  marks):
Concepts of Rta, Rna, varndharma, ashramadharma and purusartha; 

Semester End Exam Evaluation [75 marks]

  1. There shall be five compulsory  questions
  2. First four questions shall correspond to the four units
  3. Question 5 shall be  Short Notes (one  from each unit and attempt any 2 of 4)
  4. Q1 to Q4  shall contain internal choice
  5. Each question shall carry a maximum of 15 marks

Reference and reading list
I. C. Sharma. Ethical Philosophies of India
Jacques Thiroux, Ethics: Theory and Practice
James Cornman, Keith Lehrer and George Pappas. Philosophical Problems and Arguments: An Introduction
James Fieser and Norman Lillegard, Philosophical Questions: Reading and Interactive Guides (New York/Oxford: OUP, 2005)
Kedar Nath Tiwari, Classical Indian Ethical Thought (Motilal Banarasidas, 1998)
William Frankena.  Ethics (Prentice Hall, 1973)
William Lawhead. The Philosophical Journey: An Interactive Approach (Mayfield Publishing Company, 2000)

 


Class: F.Y.B.A
Paper: Moral Philosophy
Semester: II 
Marks: 75                
Code: UAPHI 201           
No. of  Lectures: 60

Unit 1: Morality of Self-interest [ 15 lectures]
(a) Hedonistic Egoism: Epicurus
(b) Psychological Egoism: Thomas Hobbes
(c) Ethical Egoism: Ayn Rand
Unit  2: Modern Ethical Theories [ 15 lectures]
(a)  Ethics of altruism: David Hume: nature and origin  of morality: sentiment (sympathy) versus reason; Virtues: artificial and natural
(b) Utilitarianism: John Stuart Mill: Critique of Jeremy Bentham’s view; Greatest Happiness principle, higher and lower pleasures, two sanctions, critical appraisal.
(c)Deontological Ethics:  Immanuel Kant: Categorical Imperative: formula of Universal law and formula of End-in-itself, critical appraisal.
Unit 3: Alternative Ethical Theories [15 lectures]
(a) Augustinian Ethics: Happiness and Virtue, love of God and neighbour
(b) Feminist Ethics: Ethics of Care: Carol Gilligan (against the backdrop of Lawrence Kohlberg’s ‘Stages of Moral Development’)
(c) Existentialist Ethics: Jean Paul Sartre
Unit 4: Theories of Punishment [15 lectures]
(a) Retributive theory, critical appraisal
(b) Deterrent theory and reformative approach to punishment; critical appraisal
(c) Capital punishment: retentionists versus abolitionists
Internal Assessment Class Test (20 marks)
Professional ethics, business ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility: Arguments for and against.

Semester End Exam Evaluation [75 marks]

  1. There shall be five compulsory  questions
  2. First four questions shall correspond to the four units
  3. Question 5 shall be a Short Note (one  from each unit and attempt any 2 of 4)
  4. Q1 to Q4  shall contain internal choice
  5. Each question shall carry a maximum of 15 marks

Reference and reading list
Ayn Rand, The Virtue of Selfishness [Introduction, chpts. 1 and 3] (New York: Signet Book, 1964)
H.B. Acton (ed.), The Philosophy of Punishment  (Macmillan, 1969)
James Fieser and Norman Lillegard, Philosophical Questions: Reading and Interactive Guides (New York and Oxford: OUP, 2005)
James McGlynn &  Jules Toner, Modern Ethical Theories (New York: Bruce Publishing Company, 1962)
Jean Paul Sartre, “Existentialism is a Humanism” in Walter Kaufman (ed.),  Existentialism from Dostoyevsky to Sartre (New American Library -Meridian Book, 1975)
Jeffery Olen and Vincent Barry,  Applying Ethics (Wadsworth, 1998)
Neil Levy, Sartre (Oneworld Publications, 2007)
Norman Bowie & Patricia Werhane, Management Ethics (Blackwell Publishing, 2005)
Richard Norman, The Moral Philosophers: An Introduction to Ethics (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1983)
Ted Honderich, Punishment: The Supposed Justifications (Penguin Books, 1969)
William Lawhead, The Philosophical Journey:  An Interactive Approach (Mayfield Publishing Company,  2000)


S.Y.B.A. Philosophy Paper II

Course Title: Social  Philosophy
Semester III
Credits: 03
Code: UAPHI301
Marks: 75                                   
Total Lectures: 45

The OBJECTIVES  of the course on Social philosophy are:

  1. To acquaint students with the basic philosophical questions and issues that current in social philosophy
  2. To equip students with argumentative and analytical skills involved in philosophising through these issues
  3. To encourage a spirit of rationality in philosophising while appreciating and respecting differing philosophical ideas and  perspectives

Unit 1. Status of Women (12 lectures)
(a) Aristotle: a case for inferiority of women
(b) J.S. Mill: a case of perfect equality between men and women
(c) Feminism: strands of feminism- liberal, social, radical; core themes: patriarchy, public private, sex and gender

Unit 2. Social Obligations to the Poor/Needy (13 lectures)
(a) Vision of sarvodaya: Gandhi (also with reference to Vinoba Bhave)
(b) Moral obligations toward the Needy: Peter Singer
(c) No Moral Obligations toward the Poor: Garrett Hardin

Unit 3. War and Pacifism (10 lectures)
(a) Principles of Justice of war (jus ad  bellum)
(b) Principles of Justice in war (jus in bello)
(c) Pacifism

Unit 4. Multiculturalism (10 lectures)
(a) Bikhu Parekh
(b) Will Kymlicka
(c) Brian Barry

Topics for Internal Assessment Class Test (20 marks)
Philosophical perspectives on family and marriage : (i) Plato (ii) Bertrand Russell and (iii) Same sex relations/marriages
Semester End Exam Evaluation [75 marks]

  1. There shall be five compulsory  questions
  2. Questions 1 to 4  shall correspond to the four units of syllabus
  3. Question 5 shall be  Short Notes (one  from each unit and attempt any 2 of 4)
  4. Q1 to Q4  shall contain internal choice
  5. Each question shall carry a maximum of 15 marks

References and reading list
Aristotle. Politics Selections from Book I
Crossman, Richard. Plato Today (Oxford University Press, 1959)
Fotion, Nicholas War and Ethics: a New Just War Theory (Continuum, 2007)
Mariana Szapuová. “Mill’s Liberal Feminism: Its Legacy and Current Criticism” Prolegomena Vol 5 No.2
Mckinnon, Catriona. (ed) Issues in Political Theory (Oxford University Press, 2008)
Mulgan R.G.  Aristotle’s Political Theory (Clarendon Press, 1977)
Plato The Republic
Russell, Bertrand. Marriage and Morals
Hardin, Garrett. “Lifeboat Ethics: The case Against Helping the Poor” in Hugh LaFollette (ed) Ethics in Practice (Blackwell Publishing, 1997, 2002)
Singer, Peter. “Famine, Affluence and Morality” in Hugh LaFollette (ed) Ethics in Practice (Blackwell Publishing, 1997, 2002)
Taylor, Charles. “The Politics of Recognition” in Colin Farrelly (ed) Contemporary Political Theory: A Reader (Sage Publishers, 2004)
Parekh, Bhikhu. “Equality of Difference” in Colin Farrelly (ed) Contemporary Political Theory: A Reader (Sage Publishers, 2004)
Kymlicka, Will. Contemporary Political Philosophy (Oxford University Press)

 


S.Y.B.A. Philosophy Paper II

Course Title: Political Philosophy
Semester IV
Credits: 03
Code: UAPHI401
Marks: 75                
Total Lectures: 45

The OBJECTIVES  of the course on Political philosophy are:

  1. To acquaint students with the basic philosophical questions and issues that are current in political philosophy
  2. To equip students with argumentative and analytical skills involved in philosophical reasoning
  3. To encourage a spirit of rationality in philosophising while appreciating and respecting differing philosophical ideas and  perspectives

Unit 1.  Justification of State: Social Contract Theory (10 lectures)
(a) Thomas Hobbes
(b) John Locke
(c) Jacques Rousseau

Unit 2. Political Ideologies ( 13 lectures)
(a) Marxism
(b) Anarchism
(c) Democracy

Unit 3. Justice (12 lectures)
(a) Justice as fairness: John Rawls
(b)  Justice as Entitlement: Robert Nozick
(c) Social justice: B.R. Ambedkar

Unit 4. Liberty (10 lectures)
(a) The Limits of state authority: J.S. Mill
(b) Ronald Dworkin: Modified liberty
(c) Two Concepts of Liberty: Isaiah Berlin

Topic for Internal Assessment Class Test (20 marks)
(a) Justification of non-violent civil disobedience:  Martin Luther King
(b)Absolute obedience to the law: Plato from the dialogue Crito

Semester End Exam Evaluation [75 marks]

  1. There shall be five compulsory  questions
  2. Questions 1 to 4  shall correspond to the four units
  3. Question 5 shall be  Short Notes (one  from each unit and attempt any 2 of 4)
  4. Q1 to Q4  shall contain internal choice
  5. Each question shall carry a maximum of 15 marks

References and reading list
Baradat, Leon. Political Ideologies: their origins and impact (Pearson-Prentice Hall, 2008)
Bird, Colin. An Introduction to Political Philosophy (Cambridge University Press, 2006)
Heywood, Andrew. Political Theory: An Introduction (Palgrave Macmillan, 2004)
Jaffrelot, Christophe. “Dr. Ambedkar’s Strategies against Untouchability and the Caste System”
King, Martin Luther. “Letter from Birmingham Jail” 
Knowles, Dudley. Political Philosophy (London: Routledge, 2001)
Omvedt, Gail.  Ambedkar: Towards an Enlightened India (Penguin Books, 2004)
Rao, K. Ramakrishna. “Gandhi and Ambedkar: Their Relevance to 21st century” Ailaan Sept 2008 Vol I, Issue: IX
Roberts, Peri and Sutch, Peter. An Introduction to Political Thought (Edinburgh University Press, 2004)

 


S.Y.B.A. Philosophy Paper III

Course Title: Vedic and Heterodox Philosophy
Semester III
Credits: 03
Code: UAPHI302
Marks: 75                                   
Total Lectures: 45

The OBJECTIVES  of the course on Indian and Western philosophy is:

  1. To acquaint students with the basic philosophical questions  that philosophers in india and the west have addressed
  2. To equip students with argumentative and analytical skills involved in philosophical reasoning
  3. To encourage a spirit of rationality in philosophising while appreciating and respecting differing philosophical systems and  perspectives

Unit 1.  Introduction and Beginnings (12 lectures)

  1. Pre-Upanishadic philosophy (Vedic cosmology)
  2. Upanishadic philosophy (Brahman, atman and world)
  3. Introduction to six darsanas: General features of the darsanas

Unit 2 Carvaka Philosophy
a. Metaphysics: denial of God, self and liberation
b. Epistemology: perception as the only valid source of knowledge, rejection of inference and testimony
c. Ethics: Hedonism
Unit 3. Jaina philosophy (10 lectures)

  1. Metaphysics: classification of reality
  2. Epistemology: Syadavada and anekantavada
  3. Ethics: Three Jewels; Anuvrata and Mahavrata.

Unit 4.  Buddhist philosophy (13 lectures)

    1. Three signs of reality: impermanence, suffering and non-substantialism
    2. Theory of No-Self (anatmavada)
    3. Ethics: Four Noble Truths; Eight-fold path.

Internal Assessment topic for Class test (20 marks)
General Characteristic of Shaktism and Shaivism
Semester End Exam Evaluation [75 marks]

  1. There shall be five compulsory  questions
  2. Questions 1 to 4  shall correspond to the four units of syllabus
  3. Question 5 shall be  Short Notes (one  from each unit and attempt any 2 of 4)
  4. Q1 to Q4  shall contain internal choice
  5. Each question shall carry a maximum of 15 marks

References and reading list
Bishop, Donald (ed.) Indian Thought: An Introduction (New Delhi: Wiley Eastern Private Ltd.,  1975)
Deussen, Paul Outlines of Indian Philosophy (New Delhi: Crest Publishing House, 1996)
Gethin, Rupert The Foundations of Buddhism (Oxford University Press, 1998)
Glasenapp, Helmuth Von Jainism: An Indian Religion of Salvation (Delhi: Motilal Banarasidas  Publishers, 1998)
Gopal, R. Outlines of Jainism
Hiriyana, M. Outlines of Indian Philosophy (Delhi: Motilal Banarasidas, 1993)
Humphreys, Christmas The Buddhist Way of Life (New Delhi: Indus Publishers,1993)
Raju, T. The Philosophical Traditions of India  (London: George Allen & Unwin Ltd., 1971)
Sangharakshita The Essential Teachings of the Buddha (New Delhi: New Age Books, 2000)
Shah, Nathubhai Jainism: The World of Conquerors (Delhi: Motilal Banarasidas Publishers, 1999)
Srinivaschari, P.N.  Ethical Philosophy of the Gita (Madras: SriRamakrishna Matt, 2001)

  

S.Y.B.A. Philosophy Paper III

Course Title: Greek and Medieval Philosophy
Semester IV
Credits: 03
Code: UAPHI402
Marks: 75                                   
Total Lectures: 45
The OBJECTIVES  of the course on Indian and Western philosophy is:

  1. To acquaint students with the basic philosophical questions  that philosophers in india and the west have addressed
  2. To equip students with argumentative and analytical skills involved in philosophical reasoning
  3. To encourage a spirit of rationality in philosophising while appreciating and respecting differing philosophical systems and  perspectives

 
Unit 1. Pre-Socratic philosophy (13 lectures)

  1. Natural philosophers (Thales, Anaximander and Anaximenes)
  2. The problem of change (Parmenides and Heraclites)
  3. Sophists: epistemology and ethics

Unit 2. Plato (10 lectures)

  1. Theory of knowledge: criticisms against sense perception
  2. Theory of Forms
  3. Tripartite Soul

Unit 3. Aristotle (12 lectures)

  1. Causation: four causes (reference to the notion of teleology)
  2. Form and Matter; actuality and potentiality
  3. Theory of soul

Unit 4. Post Aristotelian Philosophy (10 lectures)

  1. Stoicism and Pyrrhonian Scepticism
  2. General Characteristics of Islamic Philosophy
  3. Thomas Aquinas: Philosophy and Theology (reason and faith)

Internal assessment Class Test (20 marks)

  1. Socrates: method and ethics
  2. St. Augustine: theory of knowledge

Semester End Exam Evaluation [75 marks]

  1. There shall be five compulsory  questions
  2. Questions 1 to 4  shall correspond to the four units of syllabus
  3. Question 5 shall be  Short Notes (one  from each unit and attempt any 2 of 4)
  4. Q1 to Q4  shall contain internal choice
  5. Each question shall carry a maximum of 15 marks

References and reading list
Armstrong, A.H. An Introduction to Indian Philosophy (Boston: Beacon Press, 1963)
Grube, G. M. Plato’s Thought (London: Methuen, 1935)
Jones, W.T.  A History of Western Philosophy: The Medieval Mind (Harcourt, Brace and World, Inc. 1969)
Stace, W.T  A Critical History of Greek Philosophy (Macmillan, 1985,1992)
Stumpf, S.E.  &  Fieser, J.  Philosophy: History and Problems (McGraw-Hill, 1971)
Walsh, Martin A History of Philosophy (London: Geoffrey Chapman, 1985)

 


TYBA Paper: Indian-Western Philosophy (Advanced) w.e.f. June 2014

Paper: Indian Philosophy (Advanced)                             
Semester V
Credits: 4
Code: UAPHI501
No. of lectures: 60

Unit I   Nyaya & Vaisesika (18 lects)                                                                                   
a) Pratyaksa- types
b) Inference  & Verbal Testimony
c) Vaisesika – Atomism ( Sapta Padarthas-  focus on Visesa and introductory remarks on Realism)
Unit II   Samkhya  and Yoga (18 lects)
a) Prakriti & Purusa and Samkhya theory of Evolution
b) Satkarya vada ( against Nyaya’s  asatkaryavada)
c) Bahiranga Yoga ( Yama, Niyama, Asana, Pranayama & Pratyahara)                 
Unit III   Purva & Uttara Mimamsa (12 lects)                                                        
a) Mimamsa- Seven Principles of interpreting text
b) Shankara Advaita Vedanta- three   levels of reality ( Satta traya) & Vivartavada
c)  Ramanuja – Visistadvaita: Concept of Brahman, critique of maya
Unit IV   Three Contemporary Thinkers (12 lects)                                    
a) J. Krishnamurthy – Concept of Freedom and concept of Truth
b) Rabindranath Tagore – Concept of Man and concept of Freedom
c) Mohammed Iqbal: Unity of God and Man (references to be provided)

Internal Assessment Topic for Class Test (20 marks) 
The notion of Liberation  in  Nyaya,  Samkhya & Vedanta

Semester End Exam (SEE) Paper Pattern [75 marks]

  1. There shall be five compulsory  questions
  2. First four questions shall correspond to the four units
  3. Question 5 shall be  Short Notes (one  from each unit and attempt any 2 of 4)
  4. Q1 to Q4  shall contain internal choice
  5. Each question shall carry a maximum of 15 marks

Books recommended for the course
Indian Philosophy , Vol - I and II  Dr. S Radhakrishnan ( London: George Allen and Unwin Ltd., New York City: Humanities Press Inc.1923)
A History of Indian Philosophy , Vol- I and II, Jadunath Sinha (Jatindranath Sen, Central Book Agency, Calcutta, 1952)
A History of Indian Philosophy, Vol –I and II  Surendranath Dasgupta (Motilal Banarsidass Indological Publishers and Booksellers, Delhi,1975)
Outlines of Indian Philosophy, M. Hiriyanna, (Motilal Banarsidass  Publishers , Delhi, 1993)
Contemporary Indian Philosophy, Basant Kumar Lal (Motilal Banarsidass  Publishers, Delhi,1973)
Contemporary Indian Philosophy, T.M.P Mahadevan and G. V Saroja (Sterling  Publishers Pvt. Ltd, Delhi, 1981)
Practical Guide to Integral Yoga, Sri Aurobindo  (Sri Aurobindo Ashram , Pondicherry, 1955)
The synthesis of Yoga, Sri Aurobindo (Sri Aurobindo Library, New York City 1950)
Freedom from the known (Ed : Mary Lutyens) Krishnamurti J (B.I. Publication,
Bombay 1969)
Truth and Actuality, Krishnamurti J: (London, Victor Gollencz, 1978)
Religion of man  R. Tagore,  (London  Macmilan, 1930)
Man Rabindranath Tagore (Rupa & Co, 1933)
Sadhana Rabindranath Tagore (Rupa & Co….)

 

Paper: Western Philosophy (Advanced)

Semester: VI
Credits: 4
Code: UAPHI601
No. of lectures: 60
Unit 1 Rationalism (18 lects)

  1. Rene Descartes: (i) Methodic doubt (features of doubt, application of doubt, cogito ergo sum), (ii) nature of ‘self’ and not-self  in terms of  substance (substance dualism)
  2. Baruch Spinoza: (i) Metaphysics: definition and meaning of substance and how it leads to monism
  3. G.W. Leibniz: (i) Metaphysics: the concept of monads as simple substances: monadology and how it involves pluralism

Unit 2 Empiricism (18 lects)

  1. John Locke: (i) Rejection of innate ideas (ii) epistemology: origin, classification and definition of knowledge (including degrees of knowledge)
  2. George Berkeley: critique of representative theory of perception leading to subjective idealism
  3. David Hume: (i) phenomenalistic view of self (i.e. rejection of self as substance) (ii) causal relation as ‘constant conjunction’ between two events.

Unit 3 Critical Philosophy: Immanuel Kant (12 lects)

  1. Analytic/synthetic and apriori/aposteriori distinctions
  2. Reconciliation of rationalism and empiricism
  3. Causation: (reply to Hume’s view) ‘necessary relation’ between two events

Unit 4 Strands of Contemporary philosophy (12 lects)

  1. Logical positivism: elimination of metaphysics, verification principle, critical evaluation
  2. Ordinary Language Philosophy: Later Wittgenstein: notion of language game, philosophy as a therapeutic activity
  3. Postmodernism and Philosophy: General Characteristics

Internal Assessment Topic for Class Test (20 marks) 
Mind Body problem: Rene Descartes, Baruch Spinoza and Gottfried Leibniz’s view.

Semester End Exam (SEE) Paper Pattern [75 marks]

  1. There shall be five compulsory  questions
  2. First four questions shall correspond to the four units
  3. Question 5 shall be  Short Notes (one  from each unit and attempt any 2 of 4)
  4. Q1 to Q4  shall contain internal choice
  5. Each question shall carry a maximum of 15 marks

Books recommended for the course
Ayer, A.J. Language, Truth and Logic (London: Victor Gollancz Ltd., 1960)
Bennett, Jonathan. Locke Berkeley Hume: Central Themes (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1971)
Copleston, Frederick. A History of Philosophy Vol IV, V and VI (Doubleday: Image Books, 1985)
Falckenberg, Richard. History of Modern Philosophy (Calcutta: Progressive Publishers)
Gardiner, Patrick. Kierkegaard (OUP, 1988)
Garforth, F.W. The Scope of Philosophy (London: Longman, 1971)
Hampshire, Stuart. Spinoza (Penguin Books)
Hartnack, Justus.  Kant’s Theory of Knowledge (Macmillan, 1968)
Jones,W.T. Kant to Wittgenstein and Sartre: A History of Western Philosophy (Hartcourt, Brace and World, Inc, 1969)
O’Connor D.J. John Locke (New York: Dover Publications, 1967)
Saw, R. L. Leibniz (Penguin Books, 1954)
Thilly, F.  A History of Western Philosophy (SBW Publishers, New Delhi, 1993)
Warnock, G.J. Berkeley (Penguin Books, 1953)
Wright, W.K. A History of Modern Philosophy (New York: The Macmillan Company, 1941)

 


TYBA Paper 5

Paper Title: Philosophy of Religion
Semester: V
Credits: 4
Code: UAPHI502
No. of Lectures: 60
Unit 1:  Introduction to Philosophy of Religion (12 lects)

  • What is Philosophy of Religion and how it is different from Religion and Theology
  • Concept of creation: Deism, Pantheism and Theism (with Critique)
  • Attributes of God: omnipotence, omniscience, omnipresence, benevolence and personal.

Unit 2 Theories of existence of God (18 lects)

  • Ontological Argument (Anslem’s version, Descartes’ version and Kant’s critique)
  • Causal/Cosmological Argument (Aquinas’ argument, Leibniz’s argument and Hume’s critique)
  • Teleological (Aquinas and William Paley’s view; and Hume’s critique)

Unit 3: Mysticism (12 lects)
a) Characteristics of Mysticism: Ranade
b) Characteristics of Sufism
c) William James’ analysis of Mystical experiences
Unit 4: Religious Language (18 lects)

  • Analogical function of religious language (Thomas Aquinas’ view)
  • Symbolic function of religious language (Paul Tillich’s view)
  • Non Cognitive  J. R. Randall (Jr.) – Religious language as functional (cultural, artistic, social and religious)  and symbolic;  R. B. Braithwaite – Religious language from Linguistic perspective (emotive, ethical and prescriptive)

Internal Assessment Class Test (20 marks)
a) Blaise Pascal’s Wager; Criticism of the Wager
b) William James’ ‘Will to Believe’; criticism of James’ argument

Semester End Exam Paper Pattern [75 marks]

  • There shall be five compulsory  questions
  • First four questions shall correspond to the four units
  • Question 5 shall be  Short Notes (one  from each unit and attempt any 2 of 4)
  • Q1 to Q4  shall contain internal choice
  • Each question shall carry a maximum of 15 marks

Books recommended for the course
Stephen Davis. God, Reason and Theistic Proofs (Edinburgh University Press, 1997)
Anthony C. Thiselton. The Concise Encyclopaedia of the Philosophy of Religion (One World Publications, 2006).
S. P. Kanal. The Philosophy of Religion (Lotus Publishers, 1984).
D. Miall Edwards. The Philosophy of Religion (Progressive Publishers, 1963).
Steven Katz. Mysticism and Religious Tradition (Oxford University Press, 1983).
George Galloway. Philosophy of Religion (T & T Clark Edinburgh, 1960).
John Hick. Philosophy of Religion 4th Edition (Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi).
Geddes McGregor. Introduction to Religious Philosophy (MacMillan & Co. Ltd.)

 

Semester: VI

Paper: Philosophy of Religion
Credits: 4
Code: UAPHI602
No. of Lectures: 60
Unit I: Existential approach to Religion (12 lects)

  • Soren Kierkegaard (three stages of existence: aesthetics, ethical and religious)
  • Frederich Nietzsche (critique of slave morality in favour of transvaluation of values)
  • Karl Jaspers: Details of sub-topic will be done by Amit valmiki

Unit II:  Immortality  (12 lects)

  • Plato (the arguments contained in the dialogue Phaedo)
  • The concept of Resurrection and philosophical problems associated with it
  •  Transmigration: Karma and Rebirth (Vedantic View)

Unit III Question of Evil (18 lects)

  • Problem of evil
  • St. Augustine’s account of the problem and solution
  • Sankaracharya’s view on evil

Unit IV: Challenges to Religion (18 lects)

  • The Marxist Challenge: Karl Marx
  • The Freudian Challenge: Sigmund Freud
  • The Humanist Challenge: M.N. Roy

Topic for Internal Assessment Class test (20 marks)
Religious Pluralism and the idea of  Universal Religion

Semester End Exam (SEE) Paper Pattern [75 marks]

  • There shall be five compulsory  questions
  • First four questions shall correspond to the four units
  • Question 5 shall be  Short Notes (one  from each unit and attempt any 2 of 4)
  • Q1 to Q4  shall contain internal choice
  • Each question shall carry a maximum of 15 marks

Books recommended for the course
William L. Rowe and Wainwright. Philosophy of Religion (selected readings)3rd edition Harcourt  Brace college publishers.
Peterson and Vanarragon (ed.) Contemporary debates in philosophy of Religion, Blackwell publishing.
Peterson, Hasker, Rwichenbach, Basinger. Philosophy of Religion. 2nd Edition, Oxford University Press.
John Hick. Philosophy of Religion, 4h Edition Prentice-Hall off India Pvt Ltd New Delhi
Geddes Macgregor. Introduction Of Religious Philosophy, Macmillan Co Ltd St. Martin’s Press
Brightman E.S. Philosophy of Religion, Skeffington and Son Ltd
Bankey Behari. Sufis, Mystics and Yogis of India (Bhartiya Vidya Bhavan)
Titus, Smith, Nolan. Living Issues in Philosophy, (D.VanNostrand Co.)
Bronstein and Schulweis. Approaches to the Philosophy of Religion (Prentice Hall, INC.)
William J Wainwright. The Philosophy of Religion (Wardsworth INC Thomson Publishing Co.)
Yakub Masih. Philosophy of Religion.
Max Charlesworth. Philosophy and Religion – From Plato to Postmodernism (Oneworld Publications, Oxford, 2006).
Benjamin R. Tilghman. Introduction to Religious Philosophy (Blackwell, 1994).

 


TYBA Paper: 6

Paper Title: Living Ethical Issues
Semester: V
Credits: 3.5
Code: UAPHI503
No. of Lectures: 45

Unit I: Religious attitudes toward the Environment (11 lects)
(a) Vedic Puranic View.
(b) Judeo-Christian View.
Unit II:  Environmental Ethics (12 lects)
(a) Shallow and Deep ecology  models of sustainable development.
(b) Ecofeminism as sustainable development.
Unit III: Some Living Ethical Debates (11 lects)
(a) Obligations to future generations.
(b) Ethics of nuclear war
Unit IV: Freedom of Expression and Media (Print and electronic news) (11 lects)
(a) Privacy and censorship in media.
(b) Truth telling in Journalism (Truthfulness, Fairness and Objectivity in Journalism)
 
Internal Assessment Topic for Class Test (20 marks)
J.S. Mill’s view on Freedom of Thought and Discussion: 

Semester End Exam Paper Pattern [75 marks]

  1. There shall be five compulsory  questions
  2. First four questions shall correspond to the four units
  3. Question 5 shall be  Short Notes (one  from each unit and attempt any 2 of 4)
  4. There shall be internal choice questions in ANY TWO  units
  5. Each question shall carry a maximum of 15 marks

Books recommended for the course
Gottlieb, R.S. (ed.) The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Ecology Part I (Oxford University Press, 2006)
Jamieson, D. (ed.) A Companion to Environmental Philosophy (Blackwell Publishing, 2001)
Warren, K. “The Power and Promise of Ecological Feminism” in Louis P. Pojman (ed.) Environmental Ethics: Readings in Theory and Applications 3rd edn. (Wadsworth, 2001)
Zimmerman, M. (ed.) Environmental Philosophy: From Animal Rights to Deep Ecology (New Jersey: Prentice hall/Englewood Cliffs, 1993)
Frey, R.G. and Wellman, C.H. (ed.) A Companion to Applied Ethics (Blackwell, 2003)
Berry, D. (ed) Ethics and Media Culture: Practices and Representations (Focal Press, Oxford, 2000)
Smith, R.F.  Ethics in Journalism 6th edn (Blackwell, 2008)

 

Paper Title: Living Ethical Issues
Semester: VI

Credits: 3.5
Code: UAPHI603
No. of Lectures: 45

Unit I: Bioethical Issues (12 lects)
(a) Abortion: the abortion debate: pro-choice (abortionists) versus pro-life (anti-abortionists); the moral and legal justification of abortion: pros and cons
(b) Euthanasia: the moral issue: conflict between duty to prolong life  versus duty to relieve pain; forms of euthanasia: voluntary/non-voluntary and active/passive; moral and legal justification of euthanasia: pros and cons
Unit II: Ethical Issues in Reproductive Technologies (11 lects)
(a) Surrogate motherhood: nature of surrogate arrangements (will include ways in which the surrogate is inseminated, and altruistic and commercial surrogacy); redefining the notion of ‘mother’ – genetic, biological and social; advantages and critique of surrogate arrangements.
(b) Ethics of Human Cloning:  what is human cloning?; issues that make human cloning attractive; ethical dangers involved in human cloning.
Unit III: Ethical Issues in Experimentation (11 lects)
(a) Ethical issues in human research: the principles of respect for autonomy of persons, beneficence and justice
(b) Ethical issues in animal research: arguments for and against animal rights; ethical issues in scientific research on animals.
Unit IV:  Sexual Ethics (11 lects)
(a) Pornography and censorship:  pornography and obscenity; arguments for and against pornography (including feminist arguments); is censorship of pornographic material justified?
(b) Homosexuality: arguments for and against homosexuality; is State interference in individuals’ sexual preferences justified?
Internal Assessment Topic on Class Test (20 marks)
Racism and Sexism:  What is Racism and why and when it is morally wrong? What is sexism and its levels.
Semester End Exam Paper Pattern [75 marks]

  1. There shall be five compulsory  questions
  2. First four questions shall correspond to the four units
  3. Question 5 shall be  Short Notes (one  from each unit and attempt any 2 of 4)
  4. There shall be  internal choice questions in ANY TWO  units
  5. Each question shall carry a maximum of 15 marks

Books recommended for the course
Thompson, J.J. “In Defense of Abortion” in LaFollette, H. (ed) Ethics in Practice: An Anthology (Blackwell Publishing,  1997, 2002)
Marquis, D. “An Argument that Abortion is Wrong” in LaFollette, H. (ed) Ethics in Practice: An Anthology (Blackwell Publishing,  1997, 2002)
Rachels, J. “Active and passive Euthanasia” in Tom Beauchamp & LeRoy Walters (ed.) Contemporary Issues in Bioethics (Wadsworth Publishing, 1999)
Harris, J. On Cloning (Routledge, 2004)
Nussbaum, M. & Sunstein, C. (ed.) Clones and Clones. Part III. (W.W. Norton and Company: New York and London, 1998)
Beauchamp, T. and Childress, J. (ed) Principles of Biomedical Ethics
Walker, J. Environmental Ethics (Hodder & Stoughton, 2000)
Reagan, T. “The case Against Animal Research” in Tom Beauchamp & LeRoy Walters (ed.) Contemporary Issues in Bioethics (Wadsworth Publishing, 1999)
Cohen, C. “Do Animals Have Rights” in Tom Beauchamp & LeRoy Walters (ed.) Contemporary Issues in Bioethics (Wadsworth Publishing, 1999)
Foucalt Michael, History of Sexuality Vol I
Gruen, L. “Pornography and Censorship” in Frey, R.G. & Wellman, C.H. (ed) Blackwell Companion to Applied Ethics. (Blackwell Publishing, 2003)
Burton M. Leiser “Homosexuality and Unnaturalness” in Manuel Velasquez and Cynthia Rostankowski (ed.) Ethics: Theory and Practice
Michael Levin “Why Homosexuality is Abnormal” in Hugh LaFollette (ed.) Ethics in Practice: An Anthology (Blackwell Publishing,  1997,2002)
Moody-Adams, M. “Racism” in Frey, R.G. & Wellman, C.H. (ed) Blackwell Companion to Applied Ethics. (Blackwell Publishing, 2003)
Cudd, A.E. & Jones, L.E. “Sexism” in  Frey, R.G. & Wellman, C.H. (ed) Blackwell Companion to Applied Ethics. (Blackwell Publishing, 2003)
Andrea Dworkin, Pornography: Men Possessing Women (New York: Perigee Books, 1979)
Catherine Mackinnon “Sexuality, Pornography, and Method: ‘Pleasure Under Patriarchy’”, Ethics 99: 314–346 (1989)
Cornell, Drucilla  “Pornography's Temptation.” pp. 551—568 in Feminism and Pornography, edited by Drucilla Cornell. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000)
Ronald Dworkin Life’s Dominion: An Argument about Abortion, Euthanasia and Individual Freedom (Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 1994)
Julia Long. Anti-Porn: The Resurgence of Anti-pornography Feminism (Zed Books London and New York, 2012)